Florin wants presidential pardon

28 Nov 2013 13:50pm
WINDHOEK, 28 NOV (NAMPA) - Thomas Adolf Florin, who was in December 1999 sentenced to life in prison for the gruesome murder of his wife Monika Florin, wants to be considered for release on presidential pardon.
The now 47-year-old German national and former chef was sentenced to life imprisonment in the Windhoek High Court on 22 December 1999 after the court heard how he dismembered his wife's body and baked some body parts in an oven.
The court had at the time ordered that he should not be considered for release on presidential pardon even after he has spent 15 years or more years in prison.
On Thursday, Florin brought an urgent application before Windhoek High Court Judge Harald Geier in which he asked the court to issue an order instructing Namibia's National Release Board to make recommendations to the Ministry of Safety and Security that he be considered for release on presidential pardon.
In his heads of argument presented before court by his lawyer, Advocate Steve Rukoro, Florin strongly attacked some provisions of the old Prisons Act (Act Eight) of 1959, the new Prison Act (Act 17) of 1998, as well as the functions of the National Release Board which make recommendations to the Ministry of Safety and Security about prisoners who will be qualifying to be considered for release on presidential pardon.
Prominent Windhoek-based lawyer Sisa Namandje, who appeared for the respondents - being the Minister of Safety and Security Immanuel Ngatjizeko, the Head of the Windhoek Central Prison and the Chairperson of the National Release Board - said Florin's application has no merit whatsoever and should be dismissed with costs against him (the applicant).
High Court Judge Geier, after having listened to submissions and counter-arguments by the lawyers representing the two parties involved in the case, reserved his judgement on the matter.
He said lawyers representing the two parties will be notified by the Registrar of the High Court about the date when a ruling on the matter will be made public.
Florin travelled from his native Germany to Swakopmund in the Erongo Region in June 1999 to persuade his wife to return to Germany with their children.
Upon her refusal to return to Germany, he beat her to death, carved her up, and baked and boiled some of her body parts.
Florin disposed of some of the parts by dumping them in the ocean.
The children, aged two and four at the time, were in the house at the time of the brutal murder.
Neighbours thereafter started to question Florin on Monica's whereabouts, and he told them she was visiting relatives in Cape Town, South Africa, but they were not convinced.
The neighbours later discovered Monica's skull in a plastic bag and alerted the police. Florin was then arrested and charged with the murder of his wife.
During his trial, Florin stated that his wife’s alleged extra-marital affairs were the motive for the murder.
On 22 December 1999, he was found guilty and sentenced to life imprisonment in the Windhoek High Court.
The court at the time stated that parole should not be considered for at least 15 years.
Florin committed the murder when he was 32 years old.
(NAMPA)
SKE/AS