Environmental integration, key to Bank Windhoek Holdings' future growth

December 9, 2015, 9:37am


As a first step BWH has, through third-party expertise, conducted an energy and water benchmarking exercise of three of the group’s largest buildings in Windhoek, namely Capricorn House (Independence Avenue), Bank Windhoek Head Office (Independence Avenue) and CIH House (Kasino Street).  

Bank Windhoek

During the previous financial period, Bank Windhoek Holdings (BWH) initiated its first audit on water and energy consumption for its three main buildings in Windhoek.

In BWH’s recently released 2015 Sustainability Report the bank said that with increasing environmental regulations, finite resources and increasing costs (specifically energy and water) the group expects its operations to manage, measure and report on all of its environmental impacts.

As a financial services group, BWH respects the environmental laws, regulations and norms of Namibia.

During the past year, the group was committed to the efficient use of all natural resources and has set targets to reduce its carbon footprint and improve its environmental performance.

As a first step BWH has, through third-party expertise, conducted an energy and water benchmarking exercise of three of the group’s largest buildings in Windhoek, namely Capricorn House (Independence Avenue), Bank Windhoek Head Office (Independence Avenue) and CIH House (Kasino Street).

The purpose of the first phase was to enumerate the electrical energy and water consumption levels and to evaluate in broad terms the potential for energy and water saving opportunities at these facilities.

A full general energy audit on the Bank Windhoek Head Office Building, as well as a general water savings investigation was completed as part of the second phase. The deliverable comprised a report and recommendation and the development of key performance indicators.

How can environmental management be integrated into a bank’s day-to-day operations?

“There are a number of sustainability issues that intersect with our bank’s day-to-day operations, especially from an environmental perspective,” said Chris Coetzee, Chief Operating Officer at Bank Windhoek.

“Our bank’s business activities consume energy and water, which are both resources at risk of falling short in Namibia. We aim to reduce our own ecological footprint as much as possible, to support our country’s sustainability challenges. BWH is improving its eco-efficiency through a recently launched ‘Resource Efficiency Programme’ of our main buildings in Windhoek. We don’t just do it because it is the responsible thing to do but also because it makes business sense,” said Coetzee.