Councils ready for big clearance

July 28, 2015, 8:48am

Councils ready for big clearance

Two of the three local authorities earmarked for the first phase of the servicing of 200 000 plots agreed on by the government and the Affirmative Repositioning (AR) movement say they are ready for the task.
Windhoek Mayor Muesee Kazapua and Oshakati Chief Executive Officer Werner Iita yesterday pledged their readiness to identify virgin land for servicing but stressed that they were waiting on official word from the central government.
Yesterday, President Hage Geingob went to visit two identified places in the Goreangab and Cimbebasia areas that were identified by the City of Windhoek.
The municipal council of Walvis Bay, the third town, has not met yet to draw up a plan of action.
Kazapua was confident of the readiness of the City of Windhoek for what is now called the Massive Urban Land Servicing Project.
The week starting tomorrow will be dedicated to a nationwide clearance of identified urban land.
“We are ready anytime to help solve and address this problem,” said Kazapua.
“We are just waiting for official communication as to how much land they want from us and we will identify it and commence with work. I know that communication is on its way.”
Following a six-hour meeting on Friday between a government team chaired by President Hage Geingob and the AR leadership it was decided that a task team comprised of both sides would guide the process until its completion.
The AR was represented by its founders Job Amupanda, George Kambala and Dee Nauyoma, a group of young lawyers and land activists.
Oshakati’s Iita told Namibian Sun yesterday that no official information had been received.
“Up to now, all the information we have received is through the newspapers.
We’re still waiting on the relevant authorities to formally notify us and give us more details,” said Iita.
“Assuming it is correct that 200 000 residential plots countrywide will be serviced, then yes, we are prepared.
“We have vacant land in Oshakati that the town council cannot service itself, but if government steps in and helps us financially, we can clear land and service enough land for more than 2 000 plots.”

 

WINDHOEK ELVIS MURARANGANDA/ MERJA ILEKA

Namibian Sun