Process to identify land starts

July 28, 2015, 8:26am

Process to identify land starts

By Tuyeimo Haidula

THE process of identifying land that will be cleared and serviced started in Windhoek yesterday when President Hage Geingob toured parts of the city.
This comes after a meeting between government and the Affirmative Repositioning movement held in Windhoek on Friday agreed that as from this week, local authorities nationwide will identify land to be cleared, serviced and divided into 200 000 plots.
Geingob was accompanied by vice president Nickey Iyambo, Prime Minister Saara Kuugongelwa-Amadhila, minister of urban and rural development Sophia Shaningwa, Windhoek mayor Muesee Kazapua and councillors, as well as Khomas regional governor Laura McLeod-Katjirua.
The President toured the Goreagab Dam area, which some residents attempted to occupy about two weeks ago. 
He also visited Otjomuise extension 11 and 12, as well as Cimbebasia. 
“We will look around the mountains also. Expropriation can also be considered looking at neighbouring farms,” Geingob said jokingly adding that those who do not have farms around Windhoek were safe. 
Kazapua announced last week that the city has 2 000 hectares of pocket land which they are struggling to service. 
Yesterday the officials told The Namibian that the city has identified areas for potential development on the north-west, east and south of Windhoek. 
They also noted that the Goreagab Dam area, which Geingob visited, measures about 88 hectares.
They could however not give the size of the land in Otjomuise extension 11 and 12, but said there are 214 plots available. Vienna measures 160 hectares while the Cimbebasia area from extension five to eight has about 1 000 plots. 
Geingob asked staff from the municipality's department of economic development and community services how plots are allocated, the number of plots available and their sizes. 
He urged the councillors to quicken the process of identifying available land, as well as to start clearing as soon as possible.
Geingob also said the government wants people to have average-sized erven to construct houses and not to have small holdings. 
He also said government will improve the lives of those residing in shacks in informal settlements. 
This, he said, government will relocate them to build and improve their houses and then return them to their homes.
Asked how he would make sure this is done without people refusing to move without assurance, Geingob said: “We will write down their names and the piece they occupy. Then we will tell them that we will bring them back once we have developed the area and we have built proper houses for them”.
The President quickly added: “Decent shelter for people is part of my plan for poverty eradication. We will join hands and work together with the mayor (Kazapua) just as we promised.” 
He said government had decided to help the city service land.
“Rural areas will also be looked at because if we neglect them it will not help to build here. They will keep coming,” Geingob said. 
Today Geingob will visit Oshakati to identify available land there.
He could not give an estimate of the amount to be put into the whole process, despite saying the clearing will start between tomorrow and 5 August. 
Kuugongelwa-Amadhila said government is expecting leaders of the Affirmative Repositioning movement to keep their promise of providing volunteers to help service the land.
She urged people to consider voluntary service instead of the profit to be made from the exercise. 
Geingob jumped in to say some people will later turn around to say they want to be paid because they did this and that. 
Kuugongelwa-Amadhila said people should prove government wrong by coming forward to volunteer their services.

The Namibian