'No special treatment for Job's people'

July 23, 2015, 7:20am

'No special treatment for Job's people'

WITH seven days to go, Windhoek mayor Muesee Kazapua has reiterated that they will not give preferential treatment to the applications for land submitted under the Affirmative Repositioning movement.
In a meeting with President Hage Geingob at State House yesterday, Kazapua said they can allocate land only if it has been serviced.
The meeting was convened by Geingob ahead of the 31 July deadline given by the Affirmative Repositioning movement trio - Job Amupanda, Dimbulukweni Nauyoma and George Kambala - for local authorities to allocate urban land to the youth and the landless.
Geingob will meet the land activists tomorrow.
Local authorities across the country are sitting with more than 50 000 applications from the youth and people who applied after they had been mobilised by the movement.
If the local authorities fail to deliver land by 31 July, the Affirmative Repositioning has threatened to move in and occupy.
“We offer land when serviced. We are not going to give them special treatment but they will join the master list. We have 2 000 hectares of pocket land. If government can come in and help service land, we can then allocate it,” Kazapua told Geingob. 
Kazapua also said the council received 16 000 applications from the movement, which drove the city's housing backlog to 26 000.
Of the 16 000 applications submitted under the Affirmative Repositioning movement, the mayor said 800 are already on the municipality's waiting list dating back to 2004.
Addressing the councillors, Geingob said he was willing to listen to the three land activists because they claim to have solutions to the land problem. 
“Let us listen and engage them,” he said, adding that peace is very important and it can become boring for some people. 
“That is why they want to toyi-toyi, but let us not play with the future. When we take out our guns, innocent lives might be lost. As responsible people, we want to avoid that. That is why we are sitting here,” Geingob said. 
The President also pointed out that he has only been in office for three months, yet people expect a solution from him.
“It means they have so much faith in us,” he said.
Geingob also met the Council of Churches in Namibia yesterday. 
Secretary general for CCN reverend Maria Kapere said they were called to be informed on mechanisms put in place to address the land issue. 
Kapere urged the government to address the problem ahead of the deadline. 
She could not however say whether she felt the current government's pace of engagement with the land activists was too slow.
“We don't know what the Ministry of Urban and Rural Development will come up with. Only then can we comment,” she said, noting that land is a gift from God that should be made available to people who want to use it, stay on it and make an income out of it. 
Amupanda yesterday said he could not give their practical solutions now but would do so after presenting them to Geingob. 
The trio will present a 35 page document which he said will contain short and long term solutions.
“Those practical solutions are contained in the Affirmative Repositioning housing charter we will present during dialogue,” he said.
Amupanda last week said they will occupy land for residential purposes and not to make a statement. He also said when they engage government, they want practical solutions. 
“We do not dialogue on the basis of 2030,” he said then.

The Namibian