Rebecca’s holy anger over Ben10s and sugar daddies

June 2, 2015, 7:47am

Rebecca’s holy anger over Ben10s and sugar daddies

South African Gospel star Rebecca Malope says older women must stop with the so-called Ben10 culture of dating younger men, while she also urged older men to stop being sugar daddies to younger girls.
Ben10 is the term used to describe a young man who gets involved in a romantic relationship with an older woman for financial gain.
Malope made the remarks this past Sunday night while performing at an MTC-sponsored Gospel concert at the Independence Stadium, attended by thousands of Namibians who braved the chilly weather.
Malope said the Ben10 and sugar daddy culture is destroying the future of the youth and exposes them to HIV/Aids and other sexually transmitted infections.
“Our children are dying young. HIV is spreading like hot cakes. Stop abusing our children,” urged Malope.
She graced the stage in a traditional Ovambo dress.
“I am over 45 years old with a lot of experience and you are just 15. I am 30 years older than you. What can you do to me that I have not done before?” she asked, referring to older women getting sexually involved with younger men.
Referring to younger men, she said: “Some of them go to the extent of telling their mothers that their girlfriend is older than them… Stop with this Ben10 and sugar daddy story. Those are the people that deserve to be taken to the police,” she said.
Malope said these days children think they have unlimited rights and cannot be punished for their wrongdoing, because they are protected by laws.
She advised parents to discipline their children in order to get respect from them, and consequently raise respectful future citizens.
“I also have kids and if I have to punish them, I will do it. If they say they will run to the police, I will tell them to stay there. There are no government children in my house.”
Malope said the youth must not be discouraged by their parents’ financial status and whether they attend a private or public school, saying what is important is to see the silver lining, and to empower themselves academically.
Malope said today’s children are growing up in a modern society, with access to technology - a situation different from the time she was in school. Turning to the moral decay in society, Malope urged Namibians to return to God. Malope, who left her fans wanting more, was barefoot on the stage for much of her performance. The crowd went wild when she sang old favorites like Moya Wami, Look At Me and My Mother, among others. Various local artists had earlier entertained the huge crowd, including Clive and the Now Generation, the Koi International Worship Choir, D-Naff, Vuyo and Sibongile Sibeko.

WINDHOEK KENYA KAMBOWE

Namibian Sun