Autopsy confirms boy had broken pelvis

March 6, 2015, 7:06am

Autopsy confirms boy had broken pelvis

By Tuyeimo Haidula

AN AUTOPSY on the one-year-old boy who died two weeks ago, confirmed that he had a broken pelvis and a damaged liver.
Baby Hope Uhongora's babysitter, Magdalena Naries (28), was arrested last week in connection with the boy's death and she appeared in the Windhoek Magistrate's Court in Katutura on Monday. Naries is in custody at Wanaheda Police Station. The baby was buried last week in Windhoek.
The boy's parents, Issy Uhongora and Emily Muundjua, alledge that Naries was responsible for the death of their child. Hope's mother said the incident that led to her son's death happened a day before the baby's grandmother, who stayed with the baby and the maid and two other children, had decided to fire Naries.
The boy's tearful mother told The Namibian yesterday that she will never forget how she watched her son's condition deteriorate before her.
On that fateful day, Muundjua said she had passed by her mother's house. 
“My mother had asked that I should pass by because she had something to tell me. I got to her place at 19h30 but I was told she was not at home.” 
Muundjua said she found her son lying on the carpet in the sitting room, wrapped in a blanket. She further said when she lay next to the baby, she realised that he was breathing with difficulty. She then asked Naries if the boy was sick and was told the boy had vomited earlier in the day.
Muundjua said she picked him up and took him to her mother's room where they both lay down. Muundjua said although the baby would climb on and off her back, he made gurgling sounds as if he was in pain. 
“I thought he might be having internal pain since nothing was wrong with him physically,” she narrated. 
Muundjua said when her mother arrived she suggested they give Hope a painkiller, but this did not improve his condition. 
“I gave him tablets but this too did not help. He had stopped making the sounds but I could see I was losing him,” she said with tears swelling in her eyes. 
“I prayed for Hope not to leave me. I then called my brother to arrange transport to the hospital but he said he didn't have a car but came anyway.”
Muundjua said her brother asked for a glass of water to give Hope and when he drank, she had hopes that he would make it. In the meantime her mother called the landlord, who rushed them to Windhoek Central Hospital and they were advised to go to Katutura State Hospital where Hope was pronounced dead on arrival. 
“My brother said Hope breathed his last on our way to Katutura Hospital but he did not have the courage to tell us. We all went home not knowing what had caused my baby's death.”
Muundjua said she thought the autopsy report was wrong because there was no place at their house from where her son could have fallen to get such injuries.
“I only believed it when the mortuary attendant asked whether the baby had been involved in a car accident, saying his bones are fractured.”
Muundjua said Naries had only been looking after baby Hope for three weeks. 
“The first week she was okay but in the last two weeks she began to pull him by the arm every time he cried. We then saw that she is not children friendly,” she said. 
The only problem for Muundjua is explaining to Hope's siblings, aged five and three years, when they ask where their little brother is.
“I tell them Hope is not coming back and that he is in heaven. I don't even know whether they understand. We pray and read the Bible every day,” Muundjua concluded saying this is how they try to cope every day, hoping that justice will prevail. 
The baby's father, Uahongora said the family was still reeling from shock. “I just miss my baby boy,” he said.

The Namibia