Windhoek informal areas to get street lights

03 Mar 2015 08:10am
WINDHOEK, 03 MAR (NAMPA) – Windhoek City Council has approved the transfer and allocation of funds for the Targeted Intervention Programme for Employment and Economic Growth (TIPEEG) to be used in the electrification of informal settlements in the city.
TIPEEG was introduced in 2011 and met with both scepticism and optimism about reducing Namibia’s unemployment rate with the programme’s procurement system not having to abide by the rules of the tender board raising eyebrows the most.
During the monthly council meeting here on Thursday, Windhoek councilors recommended the approval of the total TIPEEG funds of N.dollars 11 125 851.82 to electrify Windhoek's informal areas.
Areas to benefit includes Tweetheni-Ehangano Settlement of Okuryangava; Khaetani Settlement of Otjomuise Extension two; Ongulubashe; Okahandja Park and Street lights for Otjomuise six and seven.
According to the official document issued during the council meeting, the Ongulumbashe and Okahandja Park electrification project is contracted to Burmeister and Partners (Pty) Ltd but the lighting of Julius Nyerere, Ongava, Omuvapu and Tauno Hatulikulipi streets in Okahandja park will be done by the City of Windhoek (CoW)'s department of electricity.
It is estimated that the Khaetani Settlement of Otjomuise Extension two project will cost N.dollars 834 399.71; Tweetheni-Ehangano Settlement project will cost N.dollars 5 229 625.84 plus the labour cost of N.dollars 763 299.10; Street lights for Otjomuise six and seven project is estimated at N.dollars 715 299.10; and lighting streets in Okahandja Park will cost about N.dollars 1 901 197.52.
TIPEEG funds amounting to N.dollars 300 million was earmarked over a three-year period for various projects relating to the CoW's core business and unique position of being able to make a tangible positive difference to the residents of this city.
The three-year programme, started from 2011/12 fiscal year to the 2013/2014 financial year, focuses on a few economic sectors, which have potential to create substantial employment opportunities.
TIPEEG was met with both scepticism and optimism about reducing Namibia’s unemployment rate with the programme’s procurement system not having to abide by the rules of the tender board raising eyebrows the most.
(NAMPA)
ME/LI/CT