Health evicts nurses to house expat doctors

January 29, 2015, 6:34am

Health evicts nurses to house expat doctors

By Ndanki Kahiurika

EIGHT Windhoek families were left homeless yesterday after the Ministry of Health and Social Services kicked them out of government houses to pave the way for expatriate doctors.
The evictions by the Messenger of Court were carried out during a light afternoon drizzle which affected those staying at houses along Florence Nightingale Street in Windhoek West and at Katutura State Hospital and Windhoek Central Hospital nurses homes.
All the families are of people who are employed by the health ministry.
Deputy Sheriff Carlos Freygang, who was accompanied by eight police officers and 10 workmen, threw out the occupants.
Freygang said all the affected people had yesterday as the deadline to move out as they had been given ample time since December last year to do so. Health ministry legal adviser Joseph Siseho said the government had informed the families in advance who had been issued eviction notices. “The occupants of these homes were not here illegally but now the ministry wants its houses back so that they can be allocated to these expatriates,” said Siseho.
At the houses along Florence Nightingale, the workmen dumped furniture and various other items in the drizzle, attracting onlookers, among them children who had just returned home from school. 
Pieces of broken furniture, clothes, shoes and bread as well as wet linen all lay in heaps on the wet ground along the road.
Children watched helplessly as the workmen pulled out furniture from the houses, while the police officers stood by in case violence broke out.
One of the evicted people, Selma Amakali, a nurse at Katutura State Hospital said she did not know what would become of her family.
“It is not that we do not want to move but the question is where to? I am on the National Housing Enterprise waiting list and have been for years. Where am I supposed to go? Why must I be treated like this by the government I fought for? “ asked Amakali. “This is inhumane,” she added.
Amakali has been a nurse at Katutura State Hospital for the past 24 years and has stayed at the house with her four children since 2008.
While some onlookers were comforting Amakali, a car pulled over and the driver asked if it was a sale. An agitated Amakali ignored him and went to inspect her damaged furniture. 
Another nurse, Juliet Indongo, who works at the Windhoek Central Hospital, said they received an eviction letter in October last year but did not move out because they had nowhere else to go.
A tearful Indongo asked if one does not have land, what can one's children inherit.
“We need our own land.We have already approached the ministry but nothing has materialised,” Indongo said. 
“All I am asking for now is that anyone who can allow us to rent their house or a room should help us. It is unfair that we fought for a government that now kicks its own children out of houses in favour of foreigners.”

The Namibian