Wrong injections claims baby life

November 26, 2014, 8:46am

Wrong injections claims baby life

Edson Haufiku

A 25-year-old resident of the Cham Cham settlement in the Oshikoto Region who lost her unborn child after she was given a wrong injection by medical staff at the Omuthiya intermediate clinic intends filing a complaint with the Health Professional Council of Namibia (HPCN) so as to make certain that other expecting mothers do not go through the same ordeal.
Rauna Kashala’s nightmare began when at eight months pregnant, she was bitten on her right foot by a poisonous snake while walking home in the company of her neighbours during the late hours of 30 October.
She was then rushed to the Omuthiya clinic, where she said a doctor and two nurses who attended to her proceeded to inject her with five different types of anti-venoms, one of which she was later informed cannot be given to pregnant women, after which she was placed on a drip for several hours before she was released the following day.
She related that on the night she arrived home it became clear to her that she had not felt any movements from her baby since being released from the clinic.
“The following day I decided to visit the clinic at Oshivelo, where I related to the doctor that I could no longer feel my baby moving. To my surprise the doctor informed me that the baby had died in my stomach,” a distraught Kashala said.
On the orders of the doctor, who is based at the Tsumeb State Hospital but regularly attends to patients at Oshivelo, Kashala was advised to return the next day to be transferred to Tsumeb for an emergency operation. On her arrival at the Tsumeb State Hospital, Kashala was hospitalised for five days without the operation being conducted, only to be told on the sixth day that she will have to be transferred to the Oshakati Intermediate Hospital, as the operating theatre at the Tsumeb health centre was ill-equipped to perform the procedure.
She was then transferred to Oshakati on 11 November, but without the initial doctor’s patient report, in which it was stated that a wrong injection was administered to her by the medical staff at Omuthiya. 
“I do not understand why they would remove the report from my health passport, knowing that it would have been essential in determining my baby’s exact cause of death. One thing I know for sure is that they did it to exonerate their colleagues at Omuthiya clinic,” Kashala added.
Despite several attempts to get a comment from the Ministry of Health and Social Services, the ministry’s public relations officer Ester Paulus could not be reached by the end of business on Tuesday.

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