Scramble for city's top job

October 23, 2014, 11:19am

Scramble for city's top job

OKAHANDJA municipality chief executive officer Frans Enkali and former director of elections Moses Ndjarakana are among the four shortlisted candidates vying to be the next CEO of Windhoek.

The race to replace the outgoing Windhoek municipality CEO, Niilo Taapopi, has gone into top gear, with political lobbying taking the forefront as aspiring successors seek assistance from politicians to land one of the most powerful local authority positions in the country.

 

The Namibian is informed that Enkali, Ndjarakana, Windhoek municipality's strategic executive for community services George Mayumbelo and Jerome Mouton, the chief executive officer at Namsov Fishing Enterprises, are the four shortlisted candidates for the job.

 

Taapopi yesterday declined to comment on the latest development, saying the process of searching for the new CEO is ongoing. “We will cross the bridge when we get there,” he said.

 

Sources said the municipality interviewed the four candidates last month and the decision on who will get the job is to be made before Taapopi steps down on 16 December this year.

 

The municipality recalled Taapopi from retirement in June this year, a few days after he had stopped working for the municipality. The municipality's strategic executive for human resources, Fillemon Hambunda, acted in the position for a few days before Taapopi was handed back the throne.

 

Taapopi was appointed for a six-month stint to lead the municipality while the management searched for his replacement.

 

He was recalled because the municipality failed to find a replacement, despite going on a headhunting mission to identify a suitable successor.

 

The decision on who will get the CEO position will come from a municipality panel, which comprises senior municipal officials and specialist guests, who will recommend to the Swapo-dominated management committee who will have their final say before passing it on to the council to endorse the successful candidate.

 

Sources in the municipality said lobbying by some of the candidates is in full swing and that some of them have even started calling influential politicians for their backing.

 

Enkali declined to comment on whether he was among the top four candidates yesterday. He did, however, confirm that he had applied for the job.

 

Enkali is a former Plan fighter. Monthly Prime Focus Magazine reported that Enkali has two masters degrees, despite only starting his Grade 12 when he was 31 years old due to the war.

 

His tenure as the boss at the Okahandja municipality has been affected by several leadership squabbles.

 

Ndjarakana, the former director of elections, is better known for his role in the disputed 2009 election saga which resulted in people objecting to his reappointment when his term ended in 31 July last year.

 

Chief executive officer at Namsov Fishing Enterprises, Mouton started his managerial career as a senior trade promotion officer at the Ministry of Trade and Industry in 1992. He was also an economist and marketing consultant at the Namibia Development Corporation.

 

Mouton worked as an executive for marketing and strategic business development at the Namibian Ports Authority from 1996 to 2008 when he left for the insurance group Liberty Life where he served for two years. He became the chief executive of Bidvest Namibia's fishing subsidiary Namsov in 2012 where he is still working.

 

Mayumbelo's name is not new in the scramble for the top position at the municipality. He lost the battle to the incumbent in 2004 when Taapopi was poached from the home affairs ministry where he was the permanent secretary.

 

The Namibian reported in 2004 that two of Windhoek's senior councillors were pushing for the appointment of a 'political candidate' as CEO of the municipality.

 

Mayumbelo and the then Premier Electric CEO Festus Lameck and current permanent secretary for the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare Erastus Negonga were running for the position.

 

The other two who lost out were University of Namibia's corruption hit senior official Boniface Mutumba, who was at that time working at Tsumeb as an administrator, and former diplomat Tonata Emvula.

 

Taapopi took charge of the municipality on 7 June 2004 from Martin Shipanga.

 

The incoming CEO will have to grapple with a city saddled with a growing population. The Namibia Statistics Agency predicts that the population of the Khomas Region would more than double the estimated 342 000 in 2011 to 645 000 in 2030.

 

The municipality is also affected by high housing prices, lack of serviced land and mushrooming of informal settlements.

Shinovene Immanuel: The Namibian

OKAHANDJA municipality chief executive officer Frans Enkali and former director of elections Moses Ndjarakana are among the four shortlisted candidates vying to be the next CEO of Windhoek.

The race to replace the outgoing Windhoek municipality CEO, Niilo Taapopi, has gone into top gear, with political lobbying taking the forefront as aspiring successors seek assistance from politicians to land one of the most powerful local authority positions in the country.

 

The Namibian is informed that Enkali, Ndjarakana, Windhoek municipality's strategic executive for community services George Mayumbelo and Jerome Mouton, the chief executive officer at Namsov Fishing Enterprises, are the four shortlisted candidates for the job.

 

Taapopi yesterday declined to comment on the latest development, saying the process of searching for the new CEO is ongoing. “We will cross the bridge when we get there,” he said.

 

Sources said the municipality interviewed the four candidates last month and the decision on who will get the job is to be made before Taapopi steps down on 16 December this year.

 

The municipality recalled Taapopi from retirement in June this year, a few days after he had stopped working for the municipality. The municipality's strategic executive for human resources, Fillemon Hambunda, acted in the position for a few days before Taapopi was handed back the throne.

 

Taapopi was appointed for a six-month stint to lead the municipality while the management searched for his replacement.

 

He was recalled because the municipality failed to find a replacement, despite going on a headhunting mission to identify a suitable successor.

 

The decision on who will get the CEO position will come from a municipality panel, which comprises senior municipal officials and specialist guests, who will recommend to the Swapo-dominated management committee who will have their final say before passing it on to the council to endorse the successful candidate.

 

Sources in the municipality said lobbying by some of the candidates is in full swing and that some of them have even started calling influential politicians for their backing.

 

Enkali declined to comment on whether he was among the top four candidates yesterday. He did, however, confirm that he had applied for the job.

 

Enkali is a former Plan fighter. Monthly Prime Focus Magazine reported that Enkali has two masters degrees, despite only starting his Grade 12 when he was 31 years old due to the war.

 

His tenure as the boss at the Okahandja municipality has been affected by several leadership squabbles.

 

Ndjarakana, the former director of elections, is better known for his role in the disputed 2009 election saga which resulted in people objecting to his reappointment when his term ended in 31 July last year.

 

Chief executive officer at Namsov Fishing Enterprises, Mouton started his managerial career as a senior trade promotion officer at the Ministry of Trade and Industry in 1992. He was also an economist and marketing consultant at the Namibia Development Corporation.

 

Mouton worked as an executive for marketing and strategic business development at the Namibian Ports Authority from 1996 to 2008 when he left for the insurance group Liberty Life where he served for two years. He became the chief executive of Bidvest Namibia's fishing subsidiary Namsov in 2012 where he is still working.

 

Mayumbelo's name is not new in the scramble for the top position at the municipality. He lost the battle to the incumbent in 2004 when Taapopi was poached from the home affairs ministry where he was the permanent secretary.

 

The Namibian reported in 2004 that two of Windhoek's senior councillors were pushing for the appointment of a 'political candidate' as CEO of the municipality.

 

Mayumbelo and the then Premier Electric CEO Festus Lameck and current permanent secretary for the Ministry of Gender Equality and Child Welfare Erastus Negonga were running for the position.

 

The other two who lost out were University of Namibia's corruption hit senior official Boniface Mutumba, who was at that time working at Tsumeb as an administrator, and former diplomat Tonata Emvula.

 

Taapopi took charge of the municipality on 7 June 2004 from Martin Shipanga.

 

The incoming CEO will have to grapple with a city saddled with a growing population. The Namibia Statistics Agency predicts that the population of the Khomas Region would more than double the estimated 342 000 in 2011 to 645 000 in 2030.

 

The municipality is also affected by high housing prices, lack of serviced land and mushrooming of informal settlements.

Shinovene Immanuel: The Namibian