Namibian beer truck used for SA smuggling

October 22, 2014, 9:25am

Namibian beer truck used for SA smuggling

Two Namibians have been arrested for trying to smuggle counterfeit goods worth N$3 million into South Africa.

The counterfeit goods, including underwear and sneakers, were hidden in a Namibian truck that was transporting Windhoek Draught beer into South Africa.

They were found with the counterfeit goods and arrested at the Ramatlabama border post between South Africa and Botswana.

The suspects have been identified as Oscar Tjingovera, 57, and Albert Tjingovera, 36.

They will launch a bail application in the Mmabatho Magistrate’s Court today.

A case of importing of illegal counterfeit goods has been opened against them.

Namibian Police spokesperson Deputy Commissioner Edwin Kanguatjivi told Namibian Sun yesterday there is a concern over the fact that Namibia is being used as a transit country for counterfeit goods.

He said that counterfeit items are being produced at factories in other countries and they are then being supplied and distributed locally.

The items are also transported to other countries, such as South Africa, via Namibia.

“There is a larger syndicate at work, but the Namibian Police can only concentrate and investigate on the businesses selling, supplying and distributing the goods here.”

Kanguatjivi said that it is up to Interpol to investigate the bigger culprits in other countries.

The two Namibian men were arrested last week Wednesday at about 07:00, when members police at the Ramatlabama border post searched the white Scania truck they were driving.

North West Police spokesperson Sergeant Kelebogile Moleko said officials requested the driver of the truck to accompany them to its trailers, in order to search and verify the items declared at the customs office.

Upon inspection, they noticed numerous boxes that were not

declared.

“The truck was then taken to the ramp for a thorough search,” said Moleko.

Officials proceeded to unload the boxes, some of which contained 1 000 pairs of brand name underwear, including Puma, Nike and Adidas, to the value of N$1.5 million.

About 50 pairs of sneakers bearing the brand name VANS, were also

found.

According to Moleko the two suspects failed to give the police an explanation for being in possession of the goods and also failed to declare them.

“The stolen goods were therefore seized and the company representing the brands was informed.”

Moleko told Namibian Sun the police are still investigating the case and will be in contact with their Namibian counterparts to verify whether there is any possibility that a larger smuggling syndicate may be

involved.

She said background checks still have to be done on the two Namibians and their passports also have to be verified and confirmed.

Moleko could, however, not confirm where the two men were planning to take the counterfeit goods.

“They refused to own up to the crime and reveal any information.”

According to her, the large number of counterfeit items found in the truck was not a regular occurrence.

“We were amazed to find these things.”

It is unclear at this stage when the confiscated beer will be released by South African

authorities.

Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group spokesperson Roux-che Locke said: “We were informed by Imperial Managed Logistics – our outsourced primary transporter - that a truck had been detained after it had been found not to have the necessary documentation in place.

“The driver was subsequently found to be in possession of an illegal

substance.”

She said the truck did not belong to O&L, which owns Namibian Breweries, but belonged to a sub-

contractor.

She said the driver had acted at his own discretion, without the knowledge of the management of the sub-

contractor.

Ellanie Smit: Namibian Sun Namibian beer truck used for SA smuggling

Two Namibians have been arrested for trying to smuggle counterfeit goods worth N$3 million into South Africa.

The counterfeit goods, including underwear and sneakers, were hidden in a Namibian truck that was transporting Windhoek Draught beer into South Africa.

They were found with the counterfeit goods and arrested at the Ramatlabama border post between South Africa and Botswana.

The suspects have been identified as Oscar Tjingovera, 57, and Albert Tjingovera, 36.

They will launch a bail application in the Mmabatho Magistrate’s Court today.

A case of importing of illegal counterfeit goods has been opened against them.

Namibian Police spokesperson Deputy Commissioner Edwin Kanguatjivi told Namibian Sun yesterday there is a concern over the fact that Namibia is being used as a transit country for counterfeit goods.

He said that counterfeit items are being produced at factories in other countries and they are then being supplied and distributed locally.

The items are also transported to other countries, such as South Africa, via Namibia.

“There is a larger syndicate at work, but the Namibian Police can only concentrate and investigate on the businesses selling, supplying and distributing the goods here.”

Kanguatjivi said that it is up to Interpol to investigate the bigger culprits in other countries.

The two Namibian men were arrested last week Wednesday at about 07:00, when members police at the Ramatlabama border post searched the white Scania truck they were driving.

North West Police spokesperson Sergeant Kelebogile Moleko said officials requested the driver of the truck to accompany them to its trailers, in order to search and verify the items declared at the customs office.

Upon inspection, they noticed numerous boxes that were not declared.

“The truck was then taken to the ramp for a thorough search,” said Moleko.

Officials proceeded to unload the boxes, some of which contained 1 000 pairs of brand name underwear, including Puma, Nike and Adidas, to the value of N$1.5 million.

About 50 pairs of sneakers bearing the brand name VANS, were also found.

According to Moleko the two suspects failed to give the police an explanation for being in possession of the goods and also failed to declare them.

“The stolen goods were therefore seized and the company representing the brands was informed.”

Moleko told Namibian Sun the police are still investigating the case and will be in contact with their Namibian counterparts to verify whether there is any possibility that a larger smuggling syndicate may be

involved.

She said background checks still have to be done on the two Namibians and their passports also have to be verified and confirmed.

Moleko could, however, not confirm where the two men were planning to take the counterfeit goods.

“They refused to own up to the crime and reveal any information.”

According to her, the large number of counterfeit items found in the truck was not a regular occurrence.

“We were amazed to find these things.”

It is unclear at this stage when the confiscated beer will be released by South African

authorities.

Ohlthaver & List (O&L) Group spokesperson Roux-che Locke said: “We were informed by Imperial Managed Logistics – our outsourced primary transporter - that a truck had been detained after it had been found not to have the necessary documentation in place.

“The driver was subsequently found to be in possession of an illegal substance.”

She said the truck did not belong to O&L, which owns Namibian Breweries, but belonged to a sub-contractor.

She said the driver had acted at his own discretion, without the knowledge of the management of the sub-contractor.

Ellanie Smit: Namibian Sun