USM ARCHAEOLOGISTS FIND PREHISTORIC CUTTING DEVICE IN PAKISTAN

12 Jul 2013 11:19

GEORGE TOWN, July 10 (Bernama) -- A group of archaeologists from Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) recently found what is believed to be a prehistoric cutting instrument in Ghandara, Pakistan.

The artefact, said to be between 15,000 and 20,000 years old, was found when the group was carrying out geophysic mapping work to study the existence of the Ghandara civilisation.

Director of USM's Centre for Global Archaeological Research, Prof Dr Mokhtar Saidin said the discovery of the artefact was important in preparing initial data to study the existence of civilisation in the area.

He said the Gandhara area, located at the border with Afghanistan and China, was believed to be inhabited by man in prehistoric time.

The archaeological research work at Gandhara was jointly carried out with the University Of Peshawar, Pakistan from June 4 to July 2.

Mokhtar said the geophysic mapping work carried out at several locations like temples, caves and ponds in the mountainous area showed remnants of ancient architecture and the existence of a water supply system during that era.

-- BERNAMA

SAY3 AZE MB